Nut Roast with za’atar – Pâté végétal aux oléagineux et za’atar

(recette en français, plus bas)

As surprising as it might sound and even if I have been a vegetarian for quite a number of years,  I had never baked or even tasted nut roasts…

The first time I heard about nut roasts was on Johanna’s blog, Green Gourmet Giraffe…  I remember finding the ingredients very appetizing and liking the idea of a vegetarian “meatloaf” (this is how it looked to me) , I kept the idea in mind and… kind of forgot about it until a few weeks ago, when Johanna announced her second “A Neb at Nut Roast” event, I pledge to myself that I would not miss it!

In case you haven’t heard of nut roast either, a it is a kind vegetarian roast made of different ingredients: one or several kind(s) of nuts + legumes or cereals + spices and/ or herbs + sometimes cheese and egg, if it is not a vegan one. Traditionnally, it is served as a vegetarian option for the Christmas dinner or any other celebration serving roasted meat. If you want to know more about Nut Roasts and learn a Scottish slang word check here (click).

The reason the name really striked me is probably because my mother tongue is French, and to my ears, a roast (un rôti, in French) sounded like a piece of meat, roasted in the oven… and if we want to go deeper into the subtleties of the French language, a nut (une noix, in French) can be at least 3 things: a walnut, a knob of something (usually, butter) or a specific piece of meat called, la noix, which is cut somewhere at the back of the poor animal’s haunch…

Of course, by seeing what it looked like, I could imagine that the translation in French would be either “pâté végétarien” or “terrine végétarienne” but this would mean that the nutty component is omitted…  I started searching recipes for a  pâté végétarien on my favourite French vegetarian cookbooks and blogs and all the vegetarian pâtés recipes I found,usually DID NOT contained any nuts, but only legume or cereal vegetables and seasoning… I even went through my copy of “Pâtés végétaux et tartinades” page by page and   but could not find any equivalent of the nut roast in over 60 recipes of vegetarian pâtés…

I started to fear that the nuts of the nut roast would be lost in the translation and in the French recipes…Was it the graal or the nut roast that I was looking for? I was starting to wonder…

Finally – hooray! -I found one of Clea’s recipes that  looked like a nut roast, it was made of lentils, walnuts and cashew, and spiced up by one of my favourite herb mix: za’atar!

I immediately tried this recipe, following exactly the instructions; even if I liked it despite the not very flavourful taste,  Mr Artichoke complained that it was very bland and he would not eat more than half a slice… As the texture was really great (the outside was firm and a little crunchy, the inside was soft and moist, with the little crunchy bits) I decided to prepare another version, changing only the quantity of za’atar and shalots and adding some extra spices and onions… The result was perfect to both our tastes: flavourful and only slightly spicy. We ate is with a salad and the rests with some bread, mustard and fresh sprouts, but  I can imagine preparing it for a picnic, or taking it in my lunch box, with a salad.

I am surely going to further  explore the world of nut roasts in a very near future! In the meantime and just in time , I am  sending this recipe to  Johanna, with my hearful thanks for making me discover nut roasts 🙂

and as one of the main ingredients is lentils,  I am also sending it to Smitha  – Kannada Kitchen, who is hosting this month edition of MLLA ( no.35). My Legume Love Affair is an event started by Susan of the blog The Well-Seasoned Cook, celebrating legumes.

Ingredient for a 20x10cm loaf tin

recipe adapted from Clea’s recipe here

200g red lentils (masoor dal)
½ teaspoon turmeric
2 shallots, finely chopped
1 medium onion or 2 small, finely chopped
50 g walnuts
100 g almonds (80g + 20g)
50 g  cashew nuts
3 tablespoons  za’atar
½ teaspoon chili powder
½ teaspoon of salt or a little more, to taste
pepper
2 tablespoons cornstarch or potato starch
1 tablespoon  flour
1 egg

note: za’atar is a Middle-eastern spice mix, composed of thyme, sesame seeds, salt and sometimes cumin. In this recipe, it can be easily replace by Madras curry powder or different combination of spices (cumin + coriander + chili powder or garam masala + chili  or parsley + oregano + garlic flakes, or whatever you like!)

Method:

Boil about a litre of water in a large saucepan. When the water boils, add turmeric and the lentils.
Reduce the heat slightly and simmer on medium heat for about 15 minutes or until lentils are soft but still firm.
Drain.

Put the shallots, onion, nuts, half the cashews, 80g almonds, chili, salt and pepper in a blender and pulse into a coarse powder.

Preheat oven to 180 ° C.

Pour the drained lentils in a bowl, add the blended mixture walnut-onion shallots and za’atar.  Mash with a fork.

Add flour and cornstarch and mix well.

In another bowl, beat the egg with a fork and add it to mixture. Stir well :  the egg needs to be distributed evenly into the mixture.

Line a loaf tin with parchment paper. Pour in the mixture and tighten it up by pressing on the top of it with your fingers..

Bake for 45 minutes.

Let it cool in the tin. Serve with a salad,  in a sandwich or cut into small sticks as an appetizer.

Pâté végétal au za’atar

Ingrédient pour un moule à cake de 20x10cm

recette adaptée d’une recette de Cléa, (ici)

200g lentilles corail

½ cuillère à café de curcuma

2 échalotes, hachée

1 oignon moyen ou 2 petits, hachés

50 grammes de cerneaux de noix
100 grammes d’amandes (80g + 20g)

50g de noix de cajou
3 cuillères à soupe de za’atar

½ cuillère à café de poudre de piment rouge

½ c.à café de sel ou un peu plus, selon votre goût

poivre
2 c. à soupe de fécule de maïs ou pomme de terre

1 c. à soupe de farine

1 oeuf

Note: le za’atar est un mélange d’épices Moyen-Oriental, composé de thym, graines de sésame, sel et parfois du cumin. Dans cette recette, il peut être facilement remplacé par de la poudre de curry Madras  ou par une combinaison d’épices (cumin + coriandre en poudre + poudre de piment ou de garam masala + chili ou de persil + origan + flocons d’ail, ou ce que vous voulez!)

Préparation :

Faire bouillir un litre d’eau dans une grande casserole. Quand l’eau bout, ajouter le curcuma et les lentilles.

Baisser un peu le feu et laisser cuire à petits bouillons pendant 15 minutes ou jusqu’à ce que les lentilles soient molles, mais encore fermes. Egoutter.

Mettre les échalotes, l’oignon, les noix, la moitié des noix de cajou, 80g d’ amandes, du sel et du poivre dans un mixeur et les réduire en poudre grossière.

Préchauffer le four à 180°C.

Verser les lentilles égouttées dans un saladier, y ajouter le mélange mixé de noix-oignons-échalotes et le za’atar. Ecraser avec une fourchette.

Ajouter la farine et la fécule et bien mélanger.

Battre l’œuf avec une fourchette et l’ajouter au mélange. Bien remuer pour que l’œuf se répartisse bien partout.

Recouvrir un moule à cake avec du papier sulfurisé. Le remplir avec le mélange et bien tasser en appuyant dessus avec les doigts.

Cuire au four pendant 45 minutes.

Laisser refroidir dans le moule. Servir avec une salade, dans un sandwich ou coupé en petits bâtonnets, comme apéritif.

White Radish with chickpeas and Pumpkin + Events announcement – Daikon aux pois chiches et courge

(en français, plus bas)

March is one of my favourite month of the year: where we live, spring is slowly starting to bloom… We have spotted the first primroses in the forest last Sunday… there is now some daylight when we wake up and… the market stalls start to be filled with crunchy fresh and local vegetables and fruits…

This month, I have the pleasure to be hosting two events celebrating vegetables:

Healing foods, is an event started by Siri of Cooking with Siri, I will give you more details about the event tomorrow, but if you want to start guessing which vegetable will be on the spotlight, I can tell you that it takes quite an effort to reach its sweet heart… 🙂

A Veggie/ Fruit a Month, is an event started by Priya of Mharo Rajasthan’s Recipes, and the veggie of the month of March 2011 is… Radish.

Whether is is the black radish, which is your liver’s best friend, for its detoxifying properties; or the small pink radish, rich in vitamins A, B & C; or the white radish, better known as daikon, which is recommended by the macrobiotic diet because it dissolves fat and oil in our system… All the kind of radishes are welcome!

Let’s share our recipes, the more, the better!

Here is how it works:

1) Prepare any vegetarian dish (eggs and dairy products are allowed) with radish as one of its main ingredients.
2) Post the dish on your blog from today onwards. You can send as many recipes as you wish, but they have to be posted between 1st and 31st March 2011.
If you wish to send archive recipes, they will have to be updated with the logo and linked to this event announcement page and to Priya’s page.  I would prefer you to discover new recipes, though…  🙂
3) Link your entry to this announcement page and to Priya’s “A Veggie/Fruit a month” page and  use the logo below


4) If you do not have a blog, you can directly send me your recipe with a picture at the email address indicated in the next section.
5)Email me at sweetartichoke[at]gmail[dot]com, indicating the subject as A Veggie/Fruit A Month, with following details:
Your Name:

Blog’s Name:

Recipe Name & url:

Picture of the dish

 

Here is my first recipe is a bengali one,  with daikon/white radish/ mooli: White Radish with chickpeas and pumpkin. What is yours?

 

Ingredients for about 2-3 servings :
Recipe adapted from C. & C. Caldicott: “World Food Café: Easy Vegetarian Recipes from Around the World”

350 g pumpkin, peeled and cubed
250g white radish (daikon, mooli), peeled, cut in halves and then sliced
250g cooked chickpeas, drained
1 tablespoon oil
2 teaspoons panch phoron
1 dry chilli
2 bay leaves
1 teaspoon grated fresh ginger
½ teaspoon turmeric
1 teaspoon coriander powder
1 teaspooon cumin powder
½ teaspoon chilli powder
Salt to taste
About 1.5 dl water
Method:
Heat the oil in a pan. When it is hot, add the panch phoron, chilli and bay leaves.
Fry until the seeds start to splutter.
Add the sliced white radish. Stir well, reduce heat to medium and sauté for a few minutes (3-4 min).
Add the cubed pumpkin and season with salt. Stir well and sauté for a few more minutes.
In a small bowl, combine the spice powders with two tablespoons of water, so that it forms a paste.
Add this paste and the grated ginger to the vegetable and 1 dl water. Stir well and add the chickpeas. Cover with a lid and simmer for about 10-15 minutes or until the vegetables are tender.

 

I am sending this recipe to Umm Mymoonah, of Taste of Pearl City who is hosting this month’s AWED on Indian Food. AWED is a monthly event, celebrating the cuisine of a particular country, created by DK, of  Chef in You.

Daikon aux pois chiches et courge

Le mois de mars est l’un de mes mois préféré, car là où nous vivons, le printemps commence lentement à arriver… Nous avons vu poindre les premières primevères en nous promenant dans la forêt dimanche dernier … il y a maintenant un peu de lumière du jour quand nous nous réveillons et les étals du marché commencent à se remplir de fruits et légumes locaux, frais et croquants…

Ce mois-ci, j’ai le plaisir d’organiser deux événements célébrant des légumes:

Healing Foods, est un événement créé par Siri du blog Cooking with Siri, je vous donnerai plus de détails sur cet événement demain, mais si vous voulez commencer à deviner quel légume sera à l’honneur, je peux vous dire qu’il faut fournir un certain effort pour atteindre son cœur tout sweet…

A Veggie / Fruit A month, est un événement créé par Priya de Mharo Rajasthan Recipes, et le légume du mois de mars 2011 est … le radis.

Que ce soit est le radis noir, qui est le meilleur ami de votre foie, grâce à ses propriétés détoxifiantes, ou le petit radis rose, riche en vitamines A, B et C, ou encore, le radis  blanc
aussi connu sous le  nom de daikon, qui est vivement recommandé par le régime macrobiotique, car il dissout la graisse et l’huile dans notre système … Tous les types de radis sont les bienvenus!

Partageons nos recettes, plus on en aura, le mieux c’est!

Ingrédients pour 2-3 personnes

Recette adaptée de C. & C. Caldicott: World Food Café: Easy Vegetarian Recipes from Around the World

350 g de courge, épluchée et coupée en dés
250g de radis blanc (daikon, mooli), pelé, coupé en deux puis coupé en rondelles
250g de pois chiches cuits et égouttés
1 cuillère à soupe d’huile
2 cuillère à café de panch phoron
1 piment sec
2 feuilles de laurier
1 cuillère à café de gingembre frais râpé
½ c. à café de curcuma
1 cuillère à café de coriandre en poudre
1 cuillère à café de cumin en poudre
½ cuillère à café de piment en poudre
Sel pour assaisonner
environ 1,5 dl d’eau
Préparation:
Chauffer l’huile dans une casserole. Quand elle est chaude, y mettre le panch phoron, le piment et les feuilles de laurier. Faire revenir jusqu’à ce que les graines commencent à sauter.
Ajouter le daikon en tranches. Bien mélanger, réduire à feu moyen et faire revenir quelques minutes (3-4 min).
Ajouter le courge en cubes et saler. Bien mélanger et faire revenir pendant quelques minutes.
Dans un petit bol, mélanger les poudres d’épices avec deux cuillères à soupe d’eau, afin de former comme une pâte.
Ajouter cette pâte,le gingembre râpé et 1 dl d’eau aux légumes. Mélanger et ajouter les pois chiches. Couvrir avec un couvercle et laisser mijoter pendant 10-15 minutes ou jusqu’à ce que les légumes soient tendres.

Moong daal with watercress – Daal (lentilles “moong”) au cresson

(en français, plus bas)

There are days, when I just feel like having  light and comforting food… This daal is one of them. The fact that it does not have garlic or onion in the seasoning makes it very easy to digest and  the watercress adds a lot of vitamin A & C . Perfect for the cold winter or hot summer days…

ingredients:

150g moong daal, washed and drained

1/2 teaspoon turmeric

1 bunch fresh watercress, washed, stems cut

salt to taste

1 teaspoon whole panch phoron

1/2 teaspoon mustard seeds

1 teaspoon cumin seeds

1 tablespoon oil

1 bay leaf

1 dry red chili

1 teaspoon grated ginger

1 pinch asafoetida

Method:

Put the daal in about  times its volume in water, with the turmeric. Bring to a boil and then reduce heat , and let simmer until the daal is cooked. As I do not use a pressure cooker, it takes about 40 minutes for me to get a mushy consistency.

Dry roast the panch phorom, mustard and cumin seeds. Let them cool down and grind. Keep aside.

When the consistency is mushy, add the coarsely chopped watercress and cook on medium heat for 2-3 minutes.

Mix two teaspoons of the powdered spices  with one teaspoon of water, to make a paste. Heat the oil in another pan. Fry the bay leaf, asafoetida, chili , ginger and the spices paste for about 2 minutes.

Pour over the daal and stir well. Cook for 1 more minute.

Serve with rice or chapati and lemon wedges to drizzle over the daal.

I am sending this daal to MLLA 32, hosted this month by Sandhya’s Kitchen.

MLLA is a monthly event celebrating legumes, created by Susan of the Well-Seasoned-Cook

 

Il ya des jours, où j’ai juste envie de nourriture simple et réconfortante… Ce daal en fait partie. Le fait qu’il ne contienne ni ail,  ni oignon dans l’assaisonnement,le rend très facile à digérer et le cresson ajoute beaucoup de vitamine A et C. Parfait pour les froides journées d’hiver …

ingrédients:
150g de lentilles moong, lavées et égouttées
1 / 2 cuillère à café de curcuma
1 botte de cresson frais, lavé, tiges coupées
sel au goût
1 cuillère à café de panch phoron
1 / 2 cuillère à café de graines de moutarde
1 cuillère à café de graines de cumin
1 cuillère à soupe d’huile
1 feuille de laurier
1 piment rouge séché
1 cuillère à café de gingembre râpé
1 pincée asafoetida

Préparation:
Mettre les lentilles dans environ trois fois leur volume d’eau, avec le curcuma. Porter à ébullition puis réduire le feu, et laisser mijoter jusqu’à ce que les lentilles soient cuites. Comme je n’ai pas de cocotte minute, il faut environ 40 minutes pour qu’elles soient cuites et écrasées (consistance de la purée ou d’une soupe épaisse).

Faire griller à sec le panch phorom, les graines de moutarde et cumin.

Laisser refroidir et moudre. Mettre de côté.

Lorsque la consistance  des lentilles est celle d’une soupe épaisse, ajouter le cresson, haché grossièrement et laisser cuire à feu moyen pendant 2-3 minutes.

Mélanger 2 cuillères à café des épices moulues avec une cuillère à café d’eau, ce qui va former une pâte. Chauffer l’huile dans une poêle. Faire frire la feuille de laurier, l’asafoetida, le piment, le gingembre et la pâte d’ épices pendant environ 2 minutes.

Verser sur les lentilles et bien mélanger. Cuire pendant 1 minute.

Servir avec du riz ou des chapatis, accompagnés de quartiers de citron pour verser quelques gouttes sur les lentilles.